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350 South 5th Street
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Minneapolis, MN  55415-1390

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Eligible Best Management Practices (BMPs)

Bioretention/Raingarden

A soil and plant–based stormwater management BMP used to filter runoff. Bioretention facilities are typically shallow depressions located in upland areas. Runoff that flows into the basin drains through the soil which filters pollutants.
 
Properties that typically use this BMP include: All
 
Storm_Rain_Garden3 Storm_Rain_Garden2 
Photo Credit: Minnesota Pollution Control Agency Stormwater Manual

Permeable Pavement

These are paving surfaces that allow stormwater runoff to filter through surface spaces into an underlying stone reservoir. They are suitable for driveways, trails, parking lots, and roadways with lighter traffic. The most commonly used permeable pavement surfaces are pervious concrete, porous asphalt, and interlocking concrete pavers. All permeable pavements have a similar design layering system: a surface pavement layer, an underlying stone aggregate reservoir layer, and geotextile over non-compacted soil subgrade. Runoff is filtered through the surrounding naturally permeable soil. 

Properties that typically use this BMP include:
All

Storm_Permeable_Pavement 
Photo Credit: Mississippi Watershed Management Organization

Infiltration Basin

This is typically a large constructed depression that captures, temporarily stores and filters the water using the surrounding soil. Infiltration basins are commonly constructed with plants that can tolerate and thrive in this unique growing environment. 

Properties that typically use this BMP include: Schools, Churches, Commercial, Multi-Family
 
Storm_Infiltration_Basin 
Photo Credit: Mississippi Watershed Management Organization

Tree Box/Tree Trench

This is a system of trees that are connected by an underground filtering structure. The system consists of a stormwater tree trench or box lined with geotextile fabric with engineered soil in which the trees are placed. Runoff is filtered through the surrounding naturally permeable soil. Tree species are carefully selected to survive both flood and drought conditions in urban environments. 
 
Properties that typically use this BMP include: Schools, Churches, Commercial, Multi-Family 
 

Infiltration Trench

This is a shallow trench that is dug 3 to 6 feet deep and filled with a coarse stone aggregate or engineered soils to allow temporary storage of runoff. Runoff is filtered through the surrounding naturally permeable soil.   

Properties that typically use this BMP include:
Schools, Churches, Commercial, Multi-Family

Storm_Infiltration_Trench 

Photo Credit: Mississippi Watershed Management Organization

Underground Infiltration

There are several underground infiltration systems, including pre-manufactured pipes, vaults, and modular structures, which have been developed for space-limited sites and stormwater retrofit projects. Underground infiltration systems are occasionally the only stormwater BMP options on fully developed sites because they can be located under other land uses such as parking lots or play areas. These systems are designed to capture, temporarily store and filter Stormwater runoff over several days.   

Properties that typically use this BMP include: Commercial, Multi-family, Ultra Urban

Storm_Underground_Infiltration 
Photo Credit: Mississippi Watershed Management Organization

Filter Media

Media filters treat stormwater by using a variety of filtering materials whose purpose is to remove pollution from runoff. Examples include: Sand, Perlite, Zeolite, Activated Carbon, and others. These filters are used to target specific pollutants and are generally used in combination with other BMPs.

Properties that typically use this BMP include:
Commercial, Industrial, Ultra Urban
 
 Storm_MediaFilters Storm_MediaFilter2
Photo Credit: Mississippi Watershed Management Organization

Green Roof

This is a series of layers suitable for plant growth that does not damage the underlying roof system.  

Properties that typically use this BMP include: Commercial, Ultra Urban 
 
Storm_Greenroof
Photo Credit: Mississippi Watershed Management Organization

Wet Sedimentation Pond/Underground Detention

This is a constructed basin that is built to capture and store stormwater runoff for an extended period of time to prevent or mitigate downstream water quality impacts. This includes a combination of permanent pool storage and extended storage above the permanent pool to provide additional water quality. Ponds rely on physical, biological, and chemical processes to remove pollutants from incoming stormwater runoff. The primary treatment mechanism is gravitational settling of particulates as stormwater runoff resides in the pond. Underground sedimentation basins may also be constructed using pre-manufactured pipes, vaults, and modular structures. 
 
Properties that typically use this BMP include: Commercial, Industrial, Multi-Family, Ultra Urban

Storm_Wet Pond
Photo Credit: Mississippi Watershed Management Organization
 

**Please note that BMP technical descriptions come from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) Stormwater Manual

 

Last updated May 9, 2019

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